Just some random thoughts that wandered through my brain while minding the grill on Saturday afternoon….

Orange tabby cat in the refrigerator
Frankie checks the fridge

I hear lots of people talking about dinner, but what has happened to supper?  Where I grew up, on the farm, the big meal was in the middle of the day, so you’d have energy to work the rest of the day.  Supper was a lighter meal, usually after dark, since you could no longer work outside without artificial light which didn’t happen in the hay field.  Well, when you have questions, look it up:

  • Supper:  Etymology: Middle English soper, super, supper, from Old French soper, super, souper, fromsoper, super, souper to eat the evening meal — more at SUP
    1 a : a meal taken at the close of the day; especially : the evening meal when dinner is taken at midday b : a social affairfeaturing a supper; specifically : an evening social (as a box social) especially for raising funds for charitable or other purposes c : a usually light evening meal
  • Dinner:  Etymology: Middle English diner, from Old French disner, diner, from disner, diner to dine — more at 1DINE
    1 : the principal meal of the day eaten about midday or in the evening; also: a formal feast or banquet in honor of some person or event

    Frankie sitting on top of the refrigerator
    Top of the food chain?

Well, I do cook dinner for friends, and I do go out to dinner.  I even occasionally even cook dinner for myself (and the cat).  Mostly, I just eat supper–it’s a comfortable meal to end my day lightly. But supper doesn’t mean a PBJ in front of the TV.  It’s likely simple–griddled fish or steak, a one-pot meal, an omelette dressed as a Spanish tortilla, or soup–easy but tasty.

A son goût! 

Orange tabby cat on the kitchen counter with the mixer, food processor, and knives
What’s cooking?

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1.  “supper.” Webster’s Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged. Merriam-Webster, 2002. http://unabridged.merriam-webster.com (5 Oct. 2012).

2.  “dinner.” Webster’s Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged. Merriam-Webster, 2002. http://unabridged.merriam-webster.com (5 Oct. 2012).

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